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Metalcuts

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Woodcuts used as book covers

A woodcut map for pilgrims

A woodcut map for pilgrims

Rom Weg Map, orientated with south to the top and with Nuremberg positioned programmatically at the centre, provides an accurate overview of the pilgrim routes to Rome from all parts of the Holy Roman Empire and some way beyond, extending as far west as Narbonne and Paris, to Scotland (but not England and Ireland), Denmark (as far as Viborg) and southern Sweden (Skane Schon) in the north, to Gdansk, Cracow, Budapest (ofen) and Montenegro in the east, and to the heel of the Italian peninsula and Corsica in the south. [Germany (Nuremberg), before 11 Aug. 1500; impression post 1550?]  [opens new window]

XYL-20 Etzlaub, Erhard: Rom Weg Map
Edition I. [Germany (Nuremberg), before 11 Aug. 1500; impression post 1550?].
Woodcut with German inscriptions.

The Rom weg map,which is orientated with south to the top and with Nuremberg positioned programmatically at the centre, provides an accurate overview of the pilgrim routes to Rome from all parts of the Holy Roman Empire and some way beyond, extending as far west as Narbonne and Paris, to Scotland (but not England and Ireland), Denmark (as far as Viborg) and southern Sweden (Skane Schon) in the north, to Gdansk, Cracow, Budapest (ofen) and Montenegro in the east, and to the heel of the Italian peninsula and Corsica in the south.

The map was devised and executed by the Nuremberg cartographer Erhard Etzlaub, probably to meet the needs of pilgrims to Rome in the holy year of 1500. The most recent publications date it to shortly before 11 Aug. 1500.

This is one of ten recorded copies of edition I.
Chancery sheet. 404 x 293 mm (woodcut 402 x 290 mm).
Watermark evidence makes it likely that this copy was printed from the original block in the later sixteenth century.

Provenance: Erwin Rosenthal (1889-1981), bookseller, at that time in Berkeley, California. Albert Ehrman (1890-1969); Presented to the Bodleian Library in 1978 by John Ehrman.

Shelfmark: Broxb. 95.24.